T O P

lexili selekti: bassoon

lexili selekti: bassoon

Gootube2000

"fagoto" (words can't end in stop consonants, and both Italian and Japanese end in -o) actually has (7 famil) with hangusa: 파곳 ~~(pagos)~~ (pagot) "o" is still pretty close to "u" so would still be somewhat difficult to distinguish from "basum" "fagoto" does resemble a rather harsh English word, but English is the only language in which this is the case. It's best to avoid false friends when they're very common across languages (like *astrologi) but this is one language, and at that, a single representative of the European language family, and with a word as common as "basum" (smile), avoiding minimal pairs is ideal. But those are just my thoughts, it's still up to Ektor, after all edit: fixed transliteration


that_orange_hat

>hangusa: 파곳 (pagos) this cant possibly be right? korean words dont end in /s/


Gootube2000

*(pagot), my bad, 곳 was transliterated as "gos" and I took it at face value


HectorO760

My sentiments exactly... We have "puto" for grape. In Spanish "puto" is similarly offensive.


that_orange_hat

that's a coincidence, "f\*g\*\*t" and "fagoto" actually come from the same etymology is the thing


HectorO760

I see, but that's still irrelevant. It has that meaning only in English. Fortunately, neither the spelling nor the pronunciation are identical, whereas "puto" is identical both ways with the Spanish word. I don't think we can make decisions based on that.


Gootube2000

The words "slave" and "ciao" share etymology. So do "comerade" (slang, fellow left winger/communist) and German "Kamerad" (slang, fellow right winger/neo-nazi). The English word "queer" was borrowed into many languages, and while some English speakers still view it as a slur because of history and/or etymology, this history and contentious connotation is absent (beyond people's individual feelings for the people it describes) in other languages, having been adopted for its meaning, not its history. I'm rambling a bit, but my point is that even etymology isn't a great deciding factor for these sorts of things


that_orange_hat

>"o" is still pretty close to "u" so would still be somewhat difficult to distinguish from "basum" "bason" and "basum" sound distinct imo. if it was basun/basum i'd get it but they differ in both a vowel and a consonant


HectorO760

I would consider "bason" and "basum" equivalent to a minimal pair for intents and purposes since nasals in word final position will tend to assimilate according to the consonant in the next word.


HectorO760

Leferesmi: fagoto


Vanege

why "bason" instead of "basun"?


that_orange_hat

"bason" sounds more like mandarin