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lexili seleti: chess

lexili seleti: chess

HectorO760

How would we say "check and "mate", and "checkmate"? Some languages say something like "xah mat", so perhaps it might be best for the name of the game to be based on that, rather than have separate words.


Gootube2000

Looking up chess-specific vocabulary in other languages was a little tricky; the Crowdin Lichess page was helpful, but I have some suspicion against the reliability of some of these translations, finding few to no other instances of the term in those languages. I'm not sure if the game itself should be named after either of the states of the game, as only European languages refer to the game after the word for "check", and even the standard names in Spanish and Portuguese for it are technically cognate with the "xatranji"-like words via Arabic. It would mean one less root in the language, and the chess terms "check" and "mate" aren't really used elsewhere, so I can certainly understand the argument in favor of naming the game after the states. Purportedly, the terms "mate" or "checkmate" are used interchangeably across languages, sometimes with the trend of experienced players saying "mate" and non-players saying "checkmate"; *"xahe ji matu" could be used for the longer one, if desired, which is consistent both with the literal meaning and the precedent of the prase "check and mate" across some languages. The words for "check" and "mate" should definitely be used as interjections like always, but probably also as nouns referring to the state, and as verbs, going by the "transitive by default" rule, I'd assume meaning something like "to put [the king] into check" and "to checkmate [someone]" Ewropali: - englisa: check (cek) - espanisa: jaque (hake) - fransesa: échec (exek) - rusisa: шах (xah) - portugalsa: xeque (xeke) - doycisa: Schach (xah) - italisa: scacco (skako) Awstronesili: - indonesisa: skak - pilipinasa: check (cek)? Alo: - putunhwa: 将 (jyang), 将军 (jyangjun) - hindisa: शह (xah), चेक (cek)? - arabisa: كش (kix) - niponsa: 王手 (ote), チェック (ceku)? - telegusa: కత్తులు దూస్తున్నాయి (katulu dustunay)? - turkisa: şah (xah) - hangusa: 체크 (ceku)? - vyetnamsa: chiếu tướng/vua (cyewtyong/vua) - parsisa: کیش (kix), شاه (xah) - swahilisa: maongezi jeni: xahu (5 famil, sama fe "xa hu"?), ceku (1-5 famil), kix (2 famil) Ewropali: - englisa: checkmate (cekmeyt) - espanisa: jaque mate (hakemate) - fransesa: échec et mat (exekemat) - rusisa: мат (mat), шах и мат (xah i mat) - portugalsa: xeque-mate (xekemate) - doycisa: Matt, Schachmatt, Schach und Matt - italisa: scacco matto (skakomato), matto Awstronesili: - indonesisa: skakmat, syahmat, sekakmat - pilipinasa: pagtalo, checkmate (cekmeyt)? Alo: - putunhwa: 杀王 (xawang), 将死 (jyangsi) - hindisa: मात (mat), शह और मात (xaharmat) - arabisa: كِش مَلِك (kix malik), مَات (mat) - niponsa: 詰み (tsumi), チェックメイト (cekumeito)? - telegusa: ఆటకట్టు (atakatu)?, మాతు (matu) - turkisa: şah mat (xahmat), mat - hangusa: 외통수 (etongsu), 체크메이트 (cekumeytu)? - vyetnamsa: chiếu hết / bí (cyewhet/bi) - parsisa: شاه مات (šâh mât), کیش و مات (KYX W MAT) - swahilisa: kaguzi jeni: matu (7-9 famil)


HectorO760

It looks to me like xahu (check) and matu (mate) would work, along with xahumatu (chess).


that_orange_hat

jeni: xatranji


Terpomo11

What would the pieces be called?


xArgonXx

manwango, femwango, biskopo, uma (or something with tyao?), towa/kastilo, nongyoyen


Terpomo11

What language other than English calls it a bishop? In French it's the fool/jester, in Arabic and Chinese it's the elephant, I think in Serbo-Croatian it's a hunter, in some Germanic languages it's a runner/messenger...


xArgonXx

In German it’s a „walker“ literally. Idk, where is Chess from? I'd take the original name. It’s from North India and or Persia. Let’s take the Persian or Hindi names.


Terpomo11

In Hindi it's either a camel, an elephant, or a *fil* (which is from the Arabic for 'elephant'.) In Urdu and Persian it's just an elephant. In Bengali it's also an elephant.


xArgonXx

Elefan it is then, I guess